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Thursday, 26 February 2015

Additional Studying Tips

I would like to add on the studying tips posted by Desmond to help you better.
1)Study when sleepy
Try to study the hardest material just before bed time because during sleep, the brain strengthens new memories, so there’s a good chance we’ll remember whatever we review right before dozing off . (Just try not to bring work into the actual bed, since it can make it harder to get a good night’s sleep.) And though bedtime is primo study time, it might also help to crack open the books after cracking open those eyes in the A.M.—in the morning, the brain still has lots of room to absorb new information.
2)Doze off
When there’s a textbook full of equations to memorize, it can be tempting to stay up all night committing them to memory (or trying to). But all-nighters rarely lead to an automatic A—in fact, they’ve been linked to impaired cognitive performance and greater sensitivity to stress . In the days leading up to a big exam, aim to get those seven to nine hours a night so sleep deprivation doesn’t undo all the hard work you’ve put in.
3)Tell a tale
Turning the details you need to remember into a crazy story helps make the information more meaningful. For example, remember the order of mathematic operations PEMDAS this way: Philip (P) wanted to eat (E) his friend Mary (M) but he died (D) from arsenic (AS) poisoning.
4)Move your butt
Research suggests studying the same stuff in a different place every day makes us less likely to forget that information. That’s because, every time we move around (from the library to the coffee shop, or the coffee shop to the toilet seat), we force the brain to form new associations with the same material so it becomes a stronger memory.
5)Write it out
Put those third-grade penmanship lessons to good use. Research suggests we store information more securely when we write it out by hand than when we type it. Start by recopying the most important notes from the semester onto a new sheet of paper. 

6)Make me wanna shout

Reading information out loud means mentally storing it in two ways: seeing it and hearing it . We just can’t guarantee you won’t get thrown out of the library.
7)Gimme a break
The KitKat guys said it, and so does science: Taking regular breaks can boost productivity and improve our ability to focus on a single task . For a real productivity boost, step away from the screen and break a sweat during a midday gym sesh

8)Work it out

Get stronger and brainier at the same time. Research has found just half an hour of aerobic exercise can improve our brain-processing speed and other important cognitive abilities. Jog a few laps around the block and see if you don’t come back with a few more IQ points.
9) Doze off
When there’s a textbook full of equations to memorize, it can be tempting to stay up all night committing them to memory (or trying to). But all-nighters rarely lead to an automatic A—in fact, they’ve been linked to impaired cognitive performance and greater sensitivity to stress . In the days leading up to a big exam, aim to get those seven to nine hours a night so sleep deprivation doesn’t undo all the hard work you’ve put in.
10)Learn what works
Some people are early birds; some are night owls; some prefer to study with a pal; others need complete and total silence. Experiment to find what’s most effective for you, and then stick with it!
More tips(I don't want to post the whole thing to avoid a super long post):http://greatist.com/happiness/better-study-tips-test
Good luck for your level tests!


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